Beef & Lamb Cuts

Beef Cuts

This topside of beef cut comes from the inner muscle of the thigh. This muscle is quite tender and very lean so it makes an excellent roasting joint.

How Can I Cook It?

Topside is ideal for roasting as it is very tender and can be carved into lean slices. Oven roast this flavoursome joint at Gas mark 4-5, 180-190°C, 350-375°F.  Make sure you baste your roasting topside of beef regularly while it's in the oven.

What Else Could I Use?

Silverside is very similar lean joint as it is the adjoining muscle, but it will need to be pot roasted or roasted with liquid to keep it from drying out. A rolled sirloin is a great alternative for a special occasion.

Did You Know?

Topside mini joints are also available in smaller cuts. These are suitable for smaller households, serving 2-3 people and the joint will cook in under an hour.

The bavette is cut from the thin flank skirt which is trimmed of all fat and connective tissue. The meat grain is coarse but tender.

What does it look like?

Bavette Recipes

How Can I Cook It?

Cook really quickly on a searingly hot grill and serve rare to enjoy at its best. A thinner cut which doesn’t need as much resting.

What Else Could I Use?

If you like your steak with lots of flavour, you could also choose a flat iron steak, or try a rib-eye.

Did You Know?

The Parisian classic Steak Frites traditionally would have been served with Bavette steak.

A mini roast is a small joint of beef of around 300-500g. It's suitable for two to three people and is ready in under an hour.

How Can I Cook It?

If you have time, take the joint out of the fridge and bring up to room temperature before you begin.

What Else Could I Use?

Mini roasts come in many different versions, one is very likely to suit what you need.

A well flavoured cut from the leg which is sold as bone-in or boneless medallion-shaped pieces of meat.

How Can I Cook It?

Perfect in a rich tasty casserole as it will thicken up the sauce itself.

What Else Could I Use?

For something to slow cook or braise try braising steak or oxtail.

Did You Know?

Beef shin contains some gristle  and connective tissue and when cooked long and slow the gristle will turn into jelly which gives it the wonderful rich beef flavour. If you buy shin of beef with the bone in you can cook it 'osso buco' style.

Stir-fry strips can be made from a number of tender muscles. Stir-fry strips are usually cut about 1cm thick so they cook quickly and as they are cut across the grain they are really tender.

How Can I Cook It?

As the name suggests, these strips of beef are perfect for stir-frying either in a wok or large frying pan. They will take 2-4 mins to cook in a hot pan.

What Else Could I Use?

If you can't get hold of ready cut beef strips you can always make your own at home. Just take a steak of your choice and slice across the grain (at 90º angle to the long meat fibres) about 1cm apart. You could also make them from a lean piece of topside.

Did You Know?

Stir-fry strips can be cut from many different areas, but always using a tender muscle so that they cook quickly and aren't tough. These muscles include feather from the chuck, fillet, topside. Which muscle your butcher uses will affect the price of the strips you buy.

Bistro rump is taken from the most tender part of the rump and is highly trimmed to produce a tender, flavoursome steak. It is slightly smaller than the prime rump steaks taken from the centre rump.

How Can I Cook It?

Bistro Rump steak is best grilled or pan-fried in a large hot frying pan.

To cook a 2cm/3/4 in thich steak:

Rare: 2 ½ minutes each side

Medium rare: 3-3 ½ minutes each side

Medium: 4 minutes each side

Well done: 6 minutes each side

Leave to rest for a couple of minutes before serving.

What Else Could I Use?

Try a premium rump steak or a sirloin if you'd like something similar. For a more everyday steak take a look at a flat iron - perfect if you like your steak cooked rare - medium.

Did You Know?

The Bistro rump steak looks very similar to fillet steak and is very tender, lean and full of flavour.

Comes from the sirloin section which is on the back of a beef animal between the fore rib and the rump. The bone is left on to add depth of flavour.

What does it look like?

Bone in sirloin

Bone in sirloin Recipes

How Can I Cook It?

This is an American classic, cooked on a red hot grill and then finished in an oven or rested properly. Can be enjoyed cooked any way you like, but rare to medium works really well.

What Else Could I Use?

If its more bone-in cuts your after why not try club steaks, T-Bone or Porterhouse.

Braising steak is cut from a variety of muscles which needs slow, moist cooking to keep it melt-in-the-mouth tender. Braising steak is usually sold in whole pieces but you can get your butcher to dice it up for you or do it yourself at home.

How Can I Cook It?

Braising steak is ideal for braising and slow-cooking. Do not cook it like you would a normal steak, as it will not be as flavoursome and tender as it can be when properly cooked.

What Else Could I Use?

If you're looking for a smaller cut to braise or cook slowly, try some diced or cubed beef, or alternatively try chuck steak or shin of beef.

Did You Know?

Also known as Casserole Steak.

The centre cut steak is taken from the 'thick flank', between the rump and the topside and silverside. This produces a very lean steak.

How Can I Cook It?

These steaks are suitable for grilling or pan-frying. Because they are very lean they will be dry and tough if cooked more than medium. To cook a 2cm/3-4 in thich steak: Rare: 2 ½ minutes each side Medium rare: 4 minutes each side Medium: 6 minutes each side Leave to rest for a couple of minutes before serving.

What Else Could I Use?

If you prefer your steak cooked between medium and well-done you might want to try a steak that tastes better with more cooking, like a rib eye. If you are looking for something tender and lean which tastes delicious cooked rare to medium, try a fillet or a flat iron if you like more flavour.

Did You Know?

The centre cut steak is a very lean and tender steak which is very popular on the continent and is called bullet steak (translated) as the muscle has the shape of a bullet.

The club steak is prepared from the fore rib.  Each steak contains half a rib bone. They are marbled with fat which keeps them succulent and tender whilst cooking and the bone give this steak great flavour.

What does it look like?

Club steak

Club steak Recipes

How Can I Cook It?

These steaks are suitable for grilling or pan-frying. Because they are very lean they will be dry and tough if cooked more than medium. Leave to rest for a couple of minutes before serving.

What Else Could I Use?

For another flavourful steak try a rib eye or for a leaner and just as tender  steak, try a centre cut steak or flat iron.

Did You Know?

The club steak is basically a rib eye steak on the bone and looks great on the plate.

Depending on what it is used for it can be cut from any muscle but is typically cut from the chuck from the shoulder area.

How Can I Cook It?

Cubes and dice are most suitable for casseroling, stewing or braising. Take a look at our recipe section for some delicious, warming ideas using beef cubes.

What Else Could I Use?

Daubes provide a chunky alternative, or if you're looking for something bigger a brisket can be used for a slow cooked pot-roast.

This steak is prepared from a single muscle out of the chuck. It is succulent and full of flavour.

What does it look like?

Denver steak

Denver steak Recipes

What Else Could I Use?

If you like your steak with lots of flavour, you could also choose a flat iron steak, or try a rib-eye.

The fillet is a very tender steak muscle which comes from the lower middle of the back and forms part of the sirloin. The fillet muscle is so tender because it does the least work. It is also a very lean cut with little fat running through it, which means it doesn't have quite so much flavour as other steak cuts. Fillet steaks are traditionally cut a bit thicker than other steaks, about 4cm or 1.5 inches.

How Can I Cook It?

A fillet steak can be grilled, pan-fried or griddled. As this is a very lean cut it can dry out if it is served really well done.

Cooking times for a fillet steak are as follows:

Rare: 3-4 minutes each side

Medium: 4-5 minutes each side

Well done: 6-7 minutes each side

Leave to rest for a couple of minutes before serving.

What Else Could I Use?

If you'd like a bit more fat and flavour try a sirloin or rump steak.

Did You Know?

The fillet is a muscle which is hardly used by the animal, which makes it the most tender muscle in the carcase. It is the most expensive of all the steak cuts as you only get about 2kg of fillet per animal.

The flat iron is taken from the 'feather' muscle which is in the chuck and blade section of the beef animal. External gristle from the muscle is removed leaving nicely marbled lean steak, best cooked rare or medium rare in the classic method (very, very hot pan or grill; both sides sealed and rested well in a warm place).

This steak can be cut from a variety of muscles but is often from the thick flank. It is cut thinly (about 1cm thick) and so cooks quickly.

How Can I Cook It?

This steak needs to be cooked quickly so that it retains its succulence and doesn't dry out and become tough. As the name suggests it is best cooked in a large hot frying pan for about a minute on each side or a little less if you want them rare.

What Else Could I Use?

The frying and minute steaks are great for a quick meal or a sandwich - for something equally quick, try some stir-fry strips, often taken from the same part of the animal.

Did You Know?

Frying steaks are often sold as an economy steak.

Hanger steak is produced from the body skirt group of muscles which are lean and sit near the internal organs so it has a stronger beefier taste to it.  This steak has a very course, open grained texture and is very lean but also very tender when cooked correctly.

What does it look like?

Hanger steak

How Can I Cook It?

A hanger steak is best served rare or medium rare as it toughens up when over cooked.  It is best pan-fried in a hot large frying pan or griddled

What Else Could I Use?

f you like your steak with lots of flavour, you could also choose a flat iron steak, or try a rib-eye.

Did You Know?

Hanger steak is often refered to as Butcher's Steak because this is often the cut that butcher's would keep for themselves because it is so tasty. This steak is also popular in Mexico where it is traditionally used to make fajitas.

This steak is prepared from the 3-bone rib section of the sirloin.

What does it look like?

Porterhouse steak Recipes

How Can I Cook It?

This bone-in classic can be served any way you like from blue to well done, grilled or in a pan. It benefits from proper resting or finishing in an oven to ensure even cooking.

What Else Could I Use?

If its more bone-in cuts your after why not try bone-in fillet, sirloin, club steaks or T-Bone.

Rump steak is taken from the centre rump section in the hindquarter. It comprises a single muscle only, unlike a traditional rump steak which is usually made up of three individual muscles all held together with connective tissue, hence, it is termed a premium rump.

How Can I Cook It?

Rump steak is best grilled or pan-fried in a large hot griddle or frying pan. It is also great for the BBQ.

To cook a 2cm/ 3/4 in thich steak:

Rare: 2 ½ minutes each side

Medium Rare: 3-3 ½ minutes each side

Medium: 4 minutes each side

Well done: 6 minutes each side

Leave to rest for a couple of minutes before serving.

What Else Could I Use?

For a similar tender steak, try a sirloin or for a more everyday steak try a flat iron - especially if you are looking for one that cooks well rare or medium rare.

Did You Know?

The prime rump steak is produced from a single rump muscle which is very tender and succulent.

These steaks come from the topside once it has been trimmed and left with a thin layer of natural fat along the top.

What does it look like?

Ranch steak

Ranch steak Recipes

How Can I Cook It?

This needs quick, high-heat grilling or frying and then rest. If scored (good idea to prevent curling up), use an oil-based marinade which will not only add flavour, but also stop it drying out.

What Else Could I Use?

If you like your steak with lots of flavour, you could also choose a flat iron steak, or try a rib-eye.

Did You Know?

Tender top steaks come from the Topside beef primal which is most often utilised for roasting joints.

Rib eye steaks are cut from the eye of the fore-rib.

How Can I Cook It?

Rib eye steaks carry a little more fat than other steaks so are great if you like your steak cooked a little longer, as the fat will melt and keep the steak succulent, tender and add lots of flavour. Follow our steak cooking guide or download our iFillet app for precise guidelines.

What Else Could I Use?

For a flavourful steak, marbled with fat try a club steak or a sirloin which has fat on top. For something leaner try a fillet or a centre cut steak.

Did You Know?

The rib 'eye' is so called because it comes from the 'eye' (centre) of the rib.

Taken from the hindquarter this is a large, lean, boneless cut of meat with very little marbling of fat and a wide-grained texture. It gets its name from the shiny silvery membrane covering its internal surface.

How Can I Cook It?

Silverside is best pot-roasted or roasted in the oven with some liquid in the roasting tray so that steam is created to keep the joint moist. Don't forget to rest your joint for at least 20 minutes before serving.

What Else Could I Use?

Topside is a similar joint, or you could try a sirloin joint for a special meal occasion.

Did You Know?

Silverside is traditionally used to make salt beef. Mini joints are also available which are suitable for smaller households and will serve 2-3 people. These joints are often sold with added fat for roasting.

Comes from the sirloin section, which is on the back of a beef animal between the fore-rib and the rump.

How Can I Cook It?

The sirloin steak has great flavour and is suitable for grilling, pan-frying, griddling or cooking on a BBQ.

To cook a 2cm/3-4 in thich steak:

Rare: 2½ minutes each side

Medium Rare: 3-3½ minutes each side

Medium: 4 minutes each side

Well done: 6 minutes each side

Leave to rest for a couple of minutes before serving.

What Else Could I Use?

If you're looking for something similar to a sirloin, try a rump steak which is taken from the rump muscle which is situated next to the sirloin.

Did You Know?

Legend has it that sirloin is so called because it was knighted 'Sir Loin' by Henry VIII.

Lamb Cuts

Barnsley chop is prepared from the saddle of lamb and is essentially a slice from the saddle roast. It is effectively a double loin chop.

How Can I Cook It?

A Barnsley chop is best grilled, griddled or pan-fried - it is quite large, so is perfect for those with a hearty appetite. Cook them for 6-8 minutes each side depending on thickness.

What Else Could I Use?

For a smaller but still meaty chop, try valentine steaks, loin chops or chump steaks or chops.

Did You Know?

The Barnsley Chop is believed to have originated at Brooklands Hotel, in Barnsley, where it is still served, though some claim it was the Kings Head pub in Barnsley.

Boneless rolled leg, as the name suggests, comes from the leg. The joint has the bone removed and is rolled to make it easier to cook and carve.

How Can I Cook It?

Boneless rolled leg is ideal for a roast and can be stuffed by your butcher or unrolled, stuffed and rolled back up at home. Oven roast at Gas mark 4-5, 180-190°C, 350-375°F. for 25 mins per 450g/lb or 30 mins per 450g/lb for well done.

What Else Could I Use?

A boneless mini-joint is ideal for smaller meal occasions. If you don't mind having a bone-in joint, try a whole or half leg.

Did You Know?

Your butcher can stuff your boneless leg of lamb for you, either with your own stuffing or one of their own recipes.

Breast of lamb is from the belly of the lamb and is a very economical cut.

What does it look like?

Breast of lamb

How Can I Cook It?

Breast is fairly fatty but very flavoursome and works best when cooked slowly so that much of the fat can melt off and be discarded from the roasting tin. Cooked this way you are left with meltingly tender meat and a really crispy skin which has lots of flavour

What Else Could I Use?

Other economical cuts include the scrag and the shank, which are best slow cooked too although in more liquid.

These firm chops are taken from the rump of the lamb at the point where the top of the leg meets the loin. These chops are plump and generally lean.

How Can I Cook It?

Cook these chops on the grill, griddle or pan-fry them for best results.  Cook them for 6-8 minutes on each side depending on thickness.

What Else Could I Use?

For that same distinctive firm texture, try a chump steak. For other meaty chops try a loin chop, valentine steak or a Barnsley chop.

Did You Know?

The chump chop is considered to be the equivalent to a rump steak in beef.

Cubed steak usually comes from the leg region and tends to be more tender than the diced shoulder. The cubes are usually cut to a thickness of 2.5cm/1 inch.

What does it look like?

Cubed boneless lamb steak

How Can I Cook It?

Cubed boneless lamb steak is really versatile. It makes delicious kebabs where quick cooking is used on either a BBQ or under a grill but this cut also makes tasty casseroles and stews.

What Else Could I Use?

Any of the other lamb cuts could be cut into cubes, but make sure that you use the correct cooking method depending on what you have cubed.  Lamb shoulder cubes will benefit from longer slower cooking like in a tagine or curry.

Did You Know?

This cut is also known as Steak cubes, cubes, lamb dice, diced lamb.

A cushion of lamb is made from the whole shoulder joint. The bones are removed and then the meat is folded into a rounded cushion shape and secured with string. It can be bought stuffed too.

What does it look like?

Cushion of lamb

How Can I Cook It?

Cushion of lamb is a lovely roasting joint, it's flavourful and easy to carve. It is designed to be stuffed so search our recipe section for some delicious stuffings.

What Else Could I Use?

An alternative roasting joint that can be stuffed is boned and rolled shoulder or leg. Also saddle of lamb makes a great roast for a special occasion and tastes delicious with a stuffing.

Did You Know?

Your butcher will be happy to prepare this for you; ask him to put a tasty stuffing inside before you pick it up to make it extra special. Either you can make your own and take it along or your butcher will probably have their own recipe too.

Diced shoulder is from the forequarter of the lamb and as the name suggests comes from the shoulder area.

How Can I Cook It?

Diced shoulder is great for stews, casseroles and curries. The leg meat will provide leaner pieces of meat but when trimmed of excess fat the shoulder will provide a slightly sweeter flavour.

What Else Could I Use?

If you are cooking a stew or casserole you could also use any of the slow cook cuts such as lamb cubes, shanks and chops.

Did You Know?

Diced shoulder is often used in curries and other exotic cuisines because it can take robust flavours.

Mince can be from a variety of different cuts of lamb; the middle neck, scrag end, breast or other forequarter offcuts. Lamb mince is perfect for dishes like shepherd's pie, moussaka, burgers and koftas.

How Can I Cook It?

Mince is very versatile due to its uniform size and shape. Its large surface area means that it cooks through fairly quickly so can be used in quick-to-cook dishes, but it can also be used in dishes which take longer to cook.

What Else Could I Use?

If you are looking for an alternative lamb cut that is quick to cook, why not try stir-fry strips? They are perfect for quick-to-cook dishes like stir-frys and sandwiches.

Did You Know?

Lamb mince was often used for shepherd's pie but more recently has become more popular for a variety of dishes.

A mini roast is simply a smaller joint of lamb, of about 300-500g. it's suitable for two to three people and is ready in between 40 minutes and an hour.

How Can I Cook It?

If you have time, take the joint out of the fridge and bring up to room temperature before you begin.

What Else Could I Use?

Mini roasts come in many different versions, one is very likely to suit what you need

Did You Know?

This cut is also known as mini joint, mini roasting joint, small roasting joint, small roast, small joint, easy carve joint, quick roast

The noisette is a small medallion made from the eye muscle of the lamb's loin, which is in the lumbar region also known as the saddle. It is a lean and flavoursome cut.

How Can I Cook It?

This cut is beautifully tender and quick to cook. They are traditionally pan-fried but can also be griddled or grilled. They will take 5-6 minutes each side.

What Else Could I Use?

While there aren't many completely boned cuts from this area, there are plenty of very flavoursome cuts. Try valentine steaks which are taken from the same muscle or Barnsley chops if you're looking for something larger.

Did You Know?

The noisette is a French cut and literally means 'little nut' or 'kernel'.

The saddle is from the loin area in the lumbar region and is made up of the loin either side of the animal. You can either buy it with the bone in or with the bone removed and rolled up into an easy-carve joint.

How Can I Cook It?

Saddle of lamb is a premium roasting joint. It can serve around 8-10 people - perfect for a special occasion. The saddle can be boned and stuffed and tied up before roasting

What Else Could I Use?

A Barnsley chop is a slice of the saddle, so if you want something quicker and for fewer people it's a good choice

Did You Know?

Your butcher will be happy to prepare this for you - ask him to put a tasty stuffing inside before you pick it up to make it extra special.

Shanks are from the bottom section of the leg just below the knee. They can be 'french trimmed' which is where a small bit of meat is removed from the bone to make the shank look more pleasing. You will need one shank per person.

How Can I Cook It?

Shanks are best cooked long and slow until the meat literally falls off the bone.  The gelatinous sinews of this small joint create a rich thick sauce when you pot roast them in wine or stock at Gas mark 3, 150ºC, 325ºF.

What Else Could I Use?

If you're looking for an inexpensive cut to cook long and slow, the scrag can also be cooked well in liquid.

Leg steaks come from the leaner part of the leg and can come either 'bone-in' or boneless. The bone-in steaks are cut from the centre of the leg, where as the boneless steaks are cut from the leg without bone.  If you want a premium leg steak then ask your butcher to cut your leg steaks from the topside.

How Can I Cook It?

Lamb leg steaks are best grilled, griddled, pan-fried or sauteed.  They are also great on the BBQ in the summer. Cook them for 6 to 8 mins on each side depending on thickness.

What Else Could I Use?

Try a loin chop, a Barnsley chop or a valentine steak for a similar meaty cut in individual portions.

The loin chop comes from one side of the lumbar area of the lamb known as the saddle and is almost an entire muscle. They contain a T-shaped bone on one side is the loin muscle and the other is the tenderloin.

How Can I Cook It?

Loin chops are best grilled or pan-fried. They cook quickly and are ideal for a quick and tasty meal and remain really tender if not over cooked. Cook then for 6-8 minutes on each side depending on thickness.

What Else Could I Use?

There are lots of meaty chops or steaks available that work well griddled, grilled or pan-fried try leg steaks, noisettes, valentine steaks, Barnsley chops, chump or traditional lamb chops.

Did You Know?

Loin chops are the lamb equivalent of the sirloin of beef.

A rack of lamb comes from the area considered to offer the most tender lamb cuts called the best end of neck.

How Can I Cook It?

Rack of lamb is a perfect roast for 2-3 people and is quick to cook too. It's best cooked in a hot oven in a roasting pan with the fat side seasoned, glazed or covered with a crust. If using a crust then you will need a medium heat oven.

What Else Could I Use?

If you would like the flavour of the rack of lamb but don't want to roast, you could fry, grill or griddle some cutlets. Alternatively, if you don't want bones then you could use noisettes.

Did You Know?

A 'rack' comprises seven ribs and is formed by several chops from the rib together in one joint.

As the names suggests, this cut comes from the shoulder of lamb.  The butcher will remove the shoulder blade, any excess fat and gristle and roll up into an easy-to-carve joint.

How Can I Cook It?

This joint is suitable for pot-roasting where the joint is pre-browned and pot-roasted slowly with vegetables, stock and fresh herbs. It is equally good for oven roasting as it is succulent, tender and perfect for stuffing.

What Else Could I Use?

An alternative family roasting joint would be from the leg, either as a bone-in or boned and rolled joint. Also, saddle of lamb makes a great roast for a special occasion. If you are pot roasting try some lamb shanks or chump chops.

Did You Know?

This joint can be unrolled, then filled with home-made or shop-bought stuffing and then rolled back up and re-tied with string or butcher's meat bands. You can also cut it into cubes to have in a stew or curry.

Valentine Steaks are taken from the loin and are essentially two chops butterflied out to provide a meatier cut.

How Can I Cook It?

Valentine steaks are best cooked on the grill, griddle or pan-fried as they can be cooked quickly and easily.

What Else Could I Use?

Noisettes are cut from a similar area on the lamb and are also entirely de-boned. Alternatively you could use a cheaper leg steak.

Did You Know?

Valentine steaks are so called because when the meat is butterflied (cut with a sharp knife almost to the end and then folded out) it folds out to create a heart shape.